This week in music: 1962 Roses are Red

(KFVS) - Let's dip into the music archives and check out the records  that DJ's were spinning 56 years ago.

Where were you in '62?   It was on this week in 1962 Billboard Magazine's Hot 100 had David Rose and His Orchestra at number five with The Stripper.  It became a hit by chance.  Rose and his orchestra had recorded Ebb Tide as the A-side of their next single.  His record company wanted to get the song out as soon as possible but realized they had no B-side.  Rose was away at the time, so an MGM office boy was given the job of going through some of Rose's tapes to find anything that would work.  He chose The Stripper which Rose had recorded in 1958.  When the record was released it was The Stripper which became the hit.

Ray Charles was in the number four spot with I Can't Stop Loving You.  It was a cover of Don Gibson's 1958 country hit.  Charles included it on his classic album Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music and took it all the way to number one on the pop chart where it stayed for five weeks.

At number three was Brian Hyland with Sealed With a Kiss. The original version of the song was recorded by The Four Voices in 1960 but it didn't become a hit.  But two years later Hyland recorded Sealed with a Kiss and it became his biggest selling record.

A vocal group from Philadelphia was in the number two position.   The Wah Watusi was The Orlons biggest hit.  The song was based on the Watusi dance which was popular at the time.
 
And in the top spot for this week in '62 was Roses are Red (My Love) by Bobby Vinton.  It was Vinton's first hit single.  Believe it or not he found the song in a pile of rejects at Epic Records.  It was a number one hit around the world and is considered one of Vinton's signature songs. "Roses are red, my love. Violets are blue. Sugar is sweet, my love. But not as sweet as you."

Download the KFVS News app: iPhone | Android

Copyright 2018 KFVS. All rights reserved.