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Thousands report feeling M4.0 earthquake near Williamsville, Mo.

Published: Nov. 17, 2021 at 9:48 PM CST|Updated: Nov. 18, 2021 at 5:16 PM CST
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SOUTHEAST Mo. (KFVS) - A second earthquake was recorded shortly after a 4.0 magnitude earthquake registered near Williamsville, Missouri on Wednesday night, November 17.

According to the USGS, a 2.5 magnitude quake was recorded at 9:40 p.m. approximately 6.8 miles southwest of Williamsville.

A 2.5 magnitude earthquake was recorded at 9:40 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17 just south of...
A 2.5 magnitude earthquake was recorded at 9:40 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 17 just south of Williamsville, Mo.(Source: USGS)

The first earthquake was recorded at 8:53 p.m. approximately 4.97 miles southeast of Williamsville.

The Williamsville, Mo. earthquake was upgraded to a magnitude 4.0.
The Williamsville, Mo. earthquake was upgraded to a magnitude 4.0.(U.S. Geological Survey)

The epicenters were in Butler County, just south of Wayne County line.

The depth of the first earthquake was 10.50 miles. The second tremor was 10.0 miles deep.

As of Thursday morning, more than 4,100 reported feeling the first quake to the USGS.

Many from Poplar Bluff, Kennett, Dunklin County, Piedmont, southern Illinois and throughout the Heartland told Heartland News they felt the quake and the lights inside of their homes also shook.

The USGS reports show the quake was felt as far away as St. Louis, Memphis, Springfield, Mo., Kansas City and Olive Branch, Mississippi.

According to the Missouri Department of Public Safety, some reported pictures were knocked off of their walls.

The Wayne County Sheriff’s Office said they had not received any reports of damage.

At least 17 reported feeling the second quake.

To learn more about the first quake from the USGS, click here. Details on the second one can be found here.

New Madrid Seismic Zone - Quaternary Fault Localities. Earthquakes with magnitudes equal to or...
New Madrid Seismic Zone - Quaternary Fault Localities. Earthquakes with magnitudes equal to or larger than 2.5 are shown by the yellow dots.(USGS)

Harvey Henson, a geologist and assistant professor at Southern Illinois University, talked to us about his expert opinion on the earthquake that hit Wednesday night.

“Geologically, it’s very significant,” he said. “And if you’re in the area and it gets your attention, you know, yeah it’s significant. But in terms of damage, you know, and intensity, no, it’s a small earthquake. But I always like to say, you know, this is a nice little reminder that we’re in a seismic zone, so this would be, um, in the broader sense of the region, part of the New Madrid Seismic Zone.”

Henson went on to explain the area has one or two small earthquakes every week in the area.

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