Crews working on sand boils in Union County, Ill.

Crews working on sand boils in Union County, Ill.
Camden said he’s been making about seven trips a day over the past four days to and from the sand boils with “rip-rap,” the larger sized rocks workers use in flooding situations.

WARE, Ill. (KFVS) - Residents and emergency management officials are not taking any chances with a small group of sand boils close to the levee in Ware, Illinois in Union County.

Right now the county is in a state of emergency with the combination of rising river levels and incoming weather, according to the Sheriff’s Department.

Deputies said many roads west of Rt. 3 are closed due to the flooding. They’re asking any non-residents to try and avoid the area, as dozens of trucks bring materials to the wall.

Heartland News reporters hitched a ride with Colton Camden, a trucker for Newman Farms and Trucking, to get to the work site.

Camden said he’s been making about seven trips a day over the past four days to and from the sand boils with “rip-rap,” the larger sized rocks workers use in flooding situations. He’s only one of about 30 trucks from the multiple private and state-ran organizations lending a hand.

Although not all of it is for fixing the boils, Camden said the road leading to the area would be covered in about 3 feet of water if they didn’t build more road on top of it with sand and rock.

According to Clear Creek Levee and Drainage Commissioner, Mitchel McLane,the boils are spots where water comes up from under ground, pushing dirt with it to the surface. Often, the dirt comes from the levee, which isn’t good.

He said they’re using a combination of sand, cloth tarps and rocks to try and fix the boil.

“You cover it with cloth then put rock on top of it, and it makes the water come up slow enough that it doesn’t bring any dirt with it,” he said.

McLane said anyone who lives near the river or anywhere around the flood wall should be keeping a close eye on all the reports. He also recommended having a plan to get out, if the waters begin to rise more.

Crews continue to tend to this spot on the levee and others at risk areas. If what Camden hears is correct, the levee should last through this flooding.

“So far so good,” he said, “they say it’s stable and the levee should hold.”

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