This week in music: 1974 The Loco-Motion - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

This week in music: 1974 The Loco-Motion

(Source: Billboard) (Source: Billboard)
(KFVS) -

Let's turn back the clock and check out the music scene from this week in 1974.

Forty-four years ago  Billboard Magazine's Hot 100 had the Jackson 5 at number five with Dancing Machine.  It was a comeback of sorts for the Jackson family.  It was their first top ten hit since Sugar Daddy back in 1971. Dancing Machine also popularized the Robot dance technique. Michael Jackson first performed the dance singing "Dancing Machine" on an episode of Soul Train.

Checking in at number four was Gladys Knight and the Pips with Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me.  Just a year earlier, Ray Price had taken the song to number one on the Country Chart.   Gladys Knight's version was a hit on both the pop and soul charts.

Elton John was at number three with Bennie and the Jets.  The song is from his Goodbye Yellow Brick Road album and John was dead set against releasing it as a single.  But he's probably glad that he did.  It became his second number one hit following Crocodile Rock and it is one of his most popular recordings.

M-F-S-B was at number two with the instrumental T-S-O-P.  MFSB stands for Mother, Father, Sister and Brother.  So what about TSOP?  It stands for The Sound of Philadelphia.  The song was written as the theme to Soul Train. It was the very first TV theme song to reach number one on the Hot 100.  Many consider it the very first "disco" song.

And in the top spot of this week in '74 was Grand Funk with The Loco-Motion. Carol King wrote the song back in 1962 and Little Eva took it her version to the top spot.  Twelve years later Grand Funk Railroad took their version to number one.  It was only the second time a song two different acts took the same song to the top spot.  The song that first accomplished the feat was Go Away Little Girl. It was also written by King. Steve Lawrence took his version to number on in 1963.  Donnie Osmond's version hit number one in 1971.

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