Jay's Bar-B-Que on the road to recovery - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Jay's Bar-B-Que on the road to recovery

Jay's BBQ  (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS) Jay's BBQ (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS)
A stack of wood used in the rebuilding of Jay's (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS) A stack of wood used in the rebuilding of Jay's (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS)
Exposed nails as part of the framework  (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS) Exposed nails as part of the framework (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS)
Framework of the new kitchen  (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS) Framework of the new kitchen (Source: Hank Cavagnaro/KFVS)
MARBLE HILL, MO (KFVS) -

Following a devastating fire in December of last year, Jay's Bar-B-Que is trying to rebuild and recover.

Especially when the place known for its smoked meats got smoked out. 

The Marble Hill fire chief called the fire at Jay's Bar-B-Que a "major loss to the community."

"She's framed up and got a roof on it," said Rick Nelson, the owner of the popular restaurant. "It's not just rebuilding but recovery too."

Through the pieces of the frame, what caused the fire is seen in the back parking lot. But the warped smoker won't sit there for long.

"No I'm thinking that things gonna go," chuckled Nelson. "I really don't want to look at that every day."

Every day the remainder of the destruction fades bit by bit and improved construction is working its way out of the ash-covered walls. The inside of the restaurant that Nelson described as outdated is looking at a facelift. They plan to reveal that during the grand opening. But the main question still up in the air is exactly when Jay's will reopen.

"We're pushing for the middle of March, to the end of March. I think what's holding us up is our smokers have to be built, the day the smokers get here shouldn't be long after that we'll be up and running again," said Nelson.

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