'CAIRO' Task Force Act introduced by lawmakers - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

'CAIRO' Task Force Act introduced by lawmakers

(Source: KFVS) (Source: KFVS)
WASHINGTON (KFVS) -

Two Senators from Illinois have introduced an act to create a task force to address the housing, health and economic crises in Cairo, Illinois.

U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) introduced the Creating American Investment, Redevelopment, and Opportunity (CAIRO) Task Force Act.

“The only way we can move Cairo and Alexander County forward is through a coordinated effort between federal, state and local officials focused on finding every possible way to help,” Duckworth said. “While I’m disappointed that Donald Trump hasn’t found time to fulfill his promises to communities like Cairo, Senator Durbin and I aren’t waiting for him to act. The hardworking people of Cairo deserve better than broken promises, which is why we’re moving forward with a plan to create a comprehensive interagency task force that is focused on finding solutions to the problems the Federal government helped create in Southern Illinois.”

“Cairo is ‘Exhibit A’ for mismanagement in Washington and locally. It is critical that the federal government does everything it can to fix this mess and promote the revitalization of this community,” said Durbin. “Since President Trump has yet to respond to our request from September pressing him to convene a new task force to work on a strategy to address the housing, health, and economic crises facing the community in Cairo, Senator Duckworth and I are introducing the CAIRO Act in order to better coordinate federal and state efforts to address the public housing crisis in Cairo and increase local economic vitality.”

The CAIRO Act requires that the task force submit a report to Congress within six months of its establishment and each year after that outlines its progress.

The senators are calling on the President to fulfill his campaign promise to help rural communities like Cairo.

Full text of the bill is available here.

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Copyright 2018 KFVS. All rights reserved.

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