This week in country music: 1991 Garth Brooks - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

This week in country music: 1991 Garth Brooks

(Source: Billboard.com) (Source: Billboard.com)
(KFVS) -

Let's check the country music scene from this week in 1991.

Billboard's country chart had Carlene Carter at number five with Come on Back.  Carter is the daughter of June Carter and her first husband Carl Smith. Come on Back is the follow up to her top three hit I Fell in Love.

The next four songs in our countdown are from some of the biggest country acts of all time.  At number four was Reba McEntire with Rumor Has It.  In the U.S. the song peaked at number three but it topped the Country charts in Canada.

George Strait was at number three with I've Come to Expect It From You.  It was coming off a five week stay at number one.  It was very rare at that time for a country record to spend multiple weeks in the top spot. Billboard ended up ranking I've Come to Expect It From You as the number two song of 1991. It was also a milestone recording for Strait as it was his 20th chart topping single.

Checking in at number two was Alabama with Forever's As Far As I'll Go.  It would go on to become the group's 29th chart topper.  It was written by former NFL player Mike Reid who spent five years with the Cincinnati Bengals.  He also wrote hits for Tanya Tucker, Ronnie Milsap, Conway Twitty and several other country acts.

And the hottest act at the time was in the number one spot this week 27 years ago.  Unanswered Prayers is one of Garth Brooks most popular recordings.  It was from his album No Fences and helped keep that album in the number one spot on the country album chart for 30 weeks.  In the song, Brooks explains why some of God's greatest gifts are prayers that go unanswered and how those Unanswered Prayers often lead to something better in life.

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