Analysis shows areas impacted most by proposed healthcare bill - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Analysis shows areas impacted most by proposed healthcare bill

No city would see a bigger negative impact than Yuma, AZ. (Source: TripAdvisor.com) No city would see a bigger negative impact than Yuma, AZ. (Source: TripAdvisor.com)

(RNN) - A recent analysis of the proposed Republican healthcare legislation identified how cities would be affected by the change in health insurance subsidies.

Using data from the Congressional Budget Office, WalletHub compared premium subsidies available in the current law, known as "Obamacare," compared to those in the proposed bill, which has been referred to as "Trumpcare" and ranked each city based on how it would be affected. The study based its findings on how a two-person household at the median age making a median income in that city would fare.

Of the 457 cities it analyzed, WalletHub identified 100 that would see the average subsidy drop. In 130 cities where median income is higher, the someone making that amount would come out ahead under the new proposal, which gives tax credits based on age.

The hardest-hit area under the proposed healthcare bill would be Yuma, AZ, a city of about 91,000 located on Arizona's border with California and Mexico. An average subsidy there would drop by $7,815. It narrowly edged Anchorage, AK, for the most negatively impacted location.

There are 23 cities that tie for the top net positive with a $6,000 increase. The median residents in those areas do not qualify for any subsidy under current law.

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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