Zika cases in Miami: What's the potential for Zika to spread? - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Zika cases in Miami: What's the potential for Zika to spread?

(Source: AP Images) (Source: AP Images)
Area for potential range of the mosquitoes carrying the virus. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/KFVS) Area for potential range of the mosquitoes carrying the virus. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/KFVS)
(KFVS) -

According to Florida Governor Rick Scott, there are at least 14 Zika cases in Florida that are likely caused by mosquitoes. He said local mosquitoes are likely spreading the Zika virus and is asking for a federal emergency response team to help stop the spread of the virus.

Scott said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention plans on issuing a travel warning to pregnant women or women thinking about becoming pregnant to the Miami, Dade County area.

Officials believe the Zika virus is occurring in that area.

On Friday, July, 29, four cases were confirmed to be the first people to contract the virus from mosquitoes in the United States.

According to the CDC, on Saturday, July 27,  there were zero locally acquired mosquito-borne cases reported. Until recently, there has there has only been travel-related Zika cases. 

As of Saturday, July 27, Florida has 307 travel related cases, Kentucky has 10, Illinois has 29, Tennessee has 16 and Missouri has 8.

Hannah Husmann just got back to Missouri from Miami on Sunday, June 31.

She said she found out about the Zika cases as she was on a weekend trip, she's been planning since last year.

"The girl sitting next to me actually got a news update on her phone and it said '4 Zika cases confirmed in Miami' and you know at the time we really didn't have time to think about it," Husmann said. "So she showed it to me and I was like 'oh great here we go.'"

Husmann said when she saw where the cases were, it wasn't too far from where she was visiting.

"I actually just recently found out, it was just north of downtown Miami, which is where we were which is kind of scary," she said.

Husmann said if the trip was longer it might have been a bigger concern with the latest Zika findings.

"So to hear that in Miami, while we were there, transmission through mosquitoes actually was a thing was pretty scary," Husmann said.

"There's a lot of new information coming out almost daily, on the Zika virus and the effects it can cause on unborn children etc," Jane Wernsman, Director of Cape Girardeau Co. Health Center said.

"I think it's to be mindful and to be kept aware of what's going on with it and try to keep updated as much as possible."

The CDC said that both men and women who've visited the Miami area since mid-June should wait at least eight weeks before trying to conceive.

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