SEMO football player explains journey to forgiveness after past - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

SEMO football player explains journey to forgiveness after past incidents with police

(Source: KFVS) (Source: KFVS)
(Source: Tremane McCullough) (Source: Tremane McCullough)
(Source: Tremane McCullough) (Source: Tremane McCullough)
(Source: Tremane McCullough) (Source: Tremane McCullough)
(Source: Tremane McCullough) (Source: Tremane McCullough)
CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) -

Cape Girardeau police and the Southeast Missouri State University football team played a friendly game of flag football on Thursday and there's one player who never thought he would be participating after some serious situations with police.

When SEMO's Runningback, Tremane McCullough, was 14 years old, his brother was shot and killed by police. It left him traumatized and full of resentment.

"You get that four o'clock in the morning call, it's nothing but bad news," McCullough said.

It happened to McCullough nine years ago. He was with his family at a church conference in Florida when the phone rang and Tremane said he instantly knew something was wrong.

"I was sleep and I just woke up to a loud scream," he said. "My momma just crying and screaming and me being that young, I really didn't know what was going on and she didn't want to tell me."

What McCullough would soon find out was his older brother, Tavaris, was shot and killed by West Palm Beach police.

"I sorta felt like my life was over," McCullough said. "That was one of my big brother that I really looked up to, he really took care of me he was more of like my father figure, I just felt like everything was over for me, I didn't know what else to do, what else to think."

Since that moment, McCullough said he's held resentment and anger against all police officers.

Over time, McCullough decided blaming all officers for the actions of one isn't fair.

"I had to feel the need in my heart to forgive all cops," he said. "All cops are not the same, you might have some bad policemen out here but all cops are not the same and you just have to find it in your heart to forgive!"

Now, the 5'10 senior will join his team and members of the Cape Girardeau Police Department in a game of flag football.

McCullough believes forgiving police would be exactly what his brother Tavaris wanted.

"I feel like he would be proud of me," McCullough said. "I can hear him right now like little bro you did it, even if you don't make it, you did it!" 

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