Beat the heat as the Heartland continues to bake - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Beat the heat as the Heartland continues to bake

(Source: Raycom Media) (Source: Raycom Media)
(KFVS) -

You probably already know that it is hot outside, but did you know that heat kills more people than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, earthquakes, and floods?

The Federal Emergency Management Agency urges everyone to prepare now for extreme heat.

According to the National Weather Service, a large portion of the country will get hit with "dangerously hot and humid conditions" throughout the week.

FEMA urges people in the affected areas to take precautions:

  • Postpone outdoor games and activities and limit exposure to the sun.
  • Drink plenty of water and avoid caffeine; limit alcoholic beverage intake.
  • Dress in loose-fitting, lightweight and light-colored clothing.
  • Spend the warmest part of the day in temperature-controlled buildings such as libraries, schools, movie theaters, shopping malls, or community facilities.
  • Check on family, friends, and neighbors who do not have air conditioning and who spend much of their time alone.

The Illinois Department of Public Health also offers some tips to avoid heat-related illness like heat exhaustion and heat stroke:

  • Stay Cool
    • Stay in air-conditioned buildings.
    • Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device.
    • Take cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.
  • Stay Hydrated
    • Drink more water than usual and don't wait until you're thirsty to hydrate.
    • Drink two to four cups of water every hour while working or exercising outside.
  • Stay Informed

According to the IDPH, the body usually cools itself by sweating, but if temperatures and humidity are extremely high, sweating is not effective in maintaining the body's normal temperature.

You can find information about the warning signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke here.

It's extremely important that you not leave anyone, including pets, alone in a closed, parked vehicle. The air temperature inside a vehicle rises very rapidly and can lead to brain damage or death.

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