Cairo residents' hopes for better future fading - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Cairo residents' hopes for better future fading

(Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS) (Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS)
(Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS) (Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS)
(Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS) (Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS)
(Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS) (Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS)
(Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS) (Source: Mike Mohundro/KFVS)
CAIRO, IL (KFVS) -

Cairo residents say they are still holding onto hope for the future of their town.

"This community, it needs help," Cairo resident Ronnie Welch said.

People in Cairo say they want more to be done to help clean up their town and bring jobs back to the area.

In the recent past, Cairo has condemned many homes and buildings, putting them up for sale.

The asking price for many of these structures is a minimum of $640.

"More needs to be done," Welch said. "You got more condemned houses around here than full houses. They need to try to tear down a lot of these houses and build some duplex houses, low income houses for some of the people. And make it a little bit better."

All one has to do is drive through Cairo to see a lot of these homes and buildings that have been condemned. On one block of 17th Street, there are seven homes condemned and one building being torn down.

Residents say they do appreciate the city and workers tearing down some of these structures, but feel overall it may be a failing effort to get the town back into the booming city it once was.

Just in January, many homes, buildings and lots of other structures were up for auction.

Whitney Strohmeyer, president of Joseph Meyers and Associates, has a contract to help sell these vacant lots. Their website says that, as of January, a total of roughly 300 lots were up for auction within the Cairo city limits.

Twenty-six of them were sold. That's about eight percent of lots there are now.

Residents say that isn't enough and that they desperately need more change for the better.

"People that don't have nowhere to stay, they basically sometime live in these houses," Welch said. "And you don't know when you're coming home that somebody's going to jump out the house or something. You just don't know what's going on around here."

These lots are still owned by the city and will be available for auction in the near future.

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