Onlookers watch the Mississippi River rise during New Year Flood - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Onlookers watch the Mississippi River rise during New Year Flood

In Grand Tower, Illinois people watched as water inched closer to the levee. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS) In Grand Tower, Illinois people watched as water inched closer to the levee. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS)
If you want to see it, make sure you're doing it in a safe way and are not putting yourself or others in any danger. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS) If you want to see it, make sure you're doing it in a safe way and are not putting yourself or others in any danger. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS)
On the other side of the bridge in Cape Girardeau, people had a stunning vantage point at the bridge. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS) On the other side of the bridge in Cape Girardeau, people had a stunning vantage point at the bridge. (Source: Sherae Honeycutt, KFVS)
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    Days of heavy rain and record river levels left roads covered with floodwaters and forced residents to evacuate in numerous locations across the Heartland.

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CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) -

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon says the flooding is not a tourist attraction, but a lot of people want to get a firsthand look at history in the making.

In Grand Tower, Illinois people watched as water inched closer to the levee.

On the other side of the bridge in Cape Girardeau, people had a stunning vantage point at the bridge.

Some visitors came to see how the river changed just overnight.

Sue Jackson was visiting Cape Girardeau from St. Louis.

"We came down last night to see how high the water was, and just decided to check it this morning to see what the difference is," Jackson said. "Yeah. Last night the water was below the railroad tracks and this morning it's significantly over."

Families with their children watched the river move from a distance.

However, boats were missing from the usual scene on the Mississippi River.

The Coast Guard closed off much of the river to traffic.

Officials say, navigating on the river right now is too hazardous.

Emergency officials want to stress that people should not to go around barriers to try and see the water.

If you want to see it, make sure you're doing it in a safe way and are not putting yourself or others in any danger.

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