Paducah residents concerned about city storm water system - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Paducah residents concerned about city storm water system

PADUCAH, KY (KFVS) -

Several residents voiced their concerns about the storm water system at the City Commission meeting in Paducah on Tuesday, July 14.

They were concerned with the system's capacity after the flash flooding from record rainfall on July 7.

Many areas in the city received more than 5 inches of rain in less than three hours.

For Kevin Comer, says his current home experienced more than two feet of water on his property due to last week’s flooding.

He says flooding in his area has been common and it's only going to get worse.

"The clock is running," Comer said. "It will flood again and it will be worse." 

According to the National Weather Service, the amount of rainfall was greater than a 100-year storm event.

"A 100-year rain event is beyond the size a municipal storm water system is typically sized," said City Manager Jeff Pederson.

However, he recommends the city commit to assessing the system and develop a plan for upgrades.

According to city leaders, the previous study of the system was conducted in 1989, which contained tens of millions of dollars worth of projects. Some of those projects have been finished; however, with development since that time, a new assessment may yield new information.

Pederson also suggested creating an advisory committee for this project and wants the city to review various funding mechanisms for the upgrades.

Comer says flooding in his area has been common and while he says he’s open minded that the city will make future changes to the water system capacity, he’s ready to see something be done about it.

 “Action, not dialogue defines character," Comer said. "I don’t care what they say, I’ve been listening to them for twenty years. All I’ve seen is inaction. I want to see what they’re going to do now. I want to see if we have their attention or if we’re going to get more lip service and more excuses.”

The McCracken County Emergency Management is also working to see if Paducah/McCracken County can be declared as a disaster area, which could make federal funds available for property owners.

The city is waiving its fees to collect flood damaged items placed curbside.

If you have flood damaged items collected by city crews and receive a charge, you can contact the Engineering-Public Works Department at 270-444-8567 to have the charge removed.

Also, if you need permits to renovate your flood damaged home or business, the permit fees will be waived.

For more information on filing a claim with the city, you can contact Martin Russell in Risk Management at 270-444-8540.

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 Copyright 2015 KFVS. All rights reserved.

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