Jonesboro residents use boats, ATVs in flood water - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Jonesboro residents use boats, ATVs in flood water

Driveways and roads are covered with several feet of water near Jonesboro. Driveways and roads are covered with several feet of water near Jonesboro.
One resident collects three-wheel ATVs and used the trikes to help people navigate through more than a quarter-mile of water covered Old Cape Road south of Jonesboro. One resident collects three-wheel ATVs and used the trikes to help people navigate through more than a quarter-mile of water covered Old Cape Road south of Jonesboro.
JONESBORO, IL (KFVS) -

After Illinois saw the most rainfall in recorded history in the month of June, many communities will be dealing with the aftermath for quite a while.

Barbara Balow of Jonesboro sent in the pictures seen in the video above, which depict driveways and roads covered with several feet of water. She explained that many people around her had no way to get out and find necessities like food and clean water.

"The water's come up, and some people are stranded in and can't get out.” explained Jonesboro resident John Mayberry on Friday. “A lot of the community has come together with boats, or anything that people need, people just help each other out in an instance like this."

Mayberry collects three-wheel ATVs (which haven’t been produced since the 1980s due to safety concerns,) and used the trikes to help people navigate through more than a quarter-mile of water covered Old Cape Road south of Jonesboro.

Several smaller sections of the roadway are also covered in water leading to the main pass, and Mayberry says most wouldn’t recognize the area in a dry season.

“Just off the road here, that’s a 20 ft. drop-off,” Mayberry said as he pointed to power lines whose cables were just a few feet above the water. “Yeah, I mean it doesn't really stop anything. People go to work, they boat across, and they park cars at the other side of the water."

Alternatively, residents could drive up what most in the area refer to as ‘fire-trail-road’ on the opposite end of the community, which is a dirt road scaling a series of hills through the forest.

"It's just really uphill,” explained resident Hannah Merriman. “There's really no flat part of the trail, just constantly going up like four or five miles, and all ruts and ditches."

“That's four wheel drive only,” said local homeowner Laura Webb, “and we came through there last night and I didn't like it. Back in ’86, we had to take a boat to my wedding… My son’s getting married next weekend, and by the looks of things, he’s gonna have to do the same.”

“Clear Creek” runs through the area, and eventually empties into the Mississippi river.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers estimates the Mississippi River crested sometime Friday after noon at 43 ft. which is 11 ft. above flood stage.

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