Residents of flooded towns depending on boats for daily tasks - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Residents of flooded towns depending on boats for daily tasks

THEBES, IL (KFVS) -

Some cities along the Mississippi River were no match to the rising flood waters.

Folks are doing all they can to deal with the problems.

For folks living in river cities like Thebes and Gail, there's not a lot they say they can do when they see flood waters creeping in.

It's a matter of having a boat and prayer.

“There is probably seven or eight houses right here,” said a Gale resident.

The Mississippi River swallowed the small town, blocking all roads outs.

By boat is how some folks get their mail, run to the store or go to work, which is until the water recedes.

“Most people have boats but if someone needs help we will help them out,” a Gale resident.

Believe it or not, Pastor Jimmy Monahan said God was on his side this rain season.

He said anytime the Mississippi River rises above 42 and half feet, he expects the church's basement turns into his own private swimming pool.

So, he's adapted.

“Everything that you see with a camera has been changed,” said Pastor Monahan.

The walls, the furnace have all been adjusted in case there's a flood.

Now, it's just a matter or removing the water.

“It just takes one person staying diligent and that's what I do,” he said.

The Army Corps of Engineers predict the worst is over.

On Tuesday, crews were busy inspecting flood walls and making sure they're prepared for any future floods.

“Water on a wall or a levee, that's roughly 3,000 pounds per foot, which is a huge load,” said Mike Watson with the Army Corps of Engineers.

Engineers say they should be out of Cairo and Charleston by Thursday and they don't expect river levels to rise and higher than 44 feet.

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