Heartland hospital takes no chance with Ebola - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Heartland hospital takes no chance with Ebola

WASHINGTON COUNTY, IL (KFVS) - Chances of an Ebola outbreak in southern Illinois are extremely unlikely, but not unthinkable, according to one Heartland hospital.

Doctors and nurses at the Washington County Hospital in Nashville, Illinois say they're not taking any chances when it comes to the possible spread of Ebola and other diseases.

Whether you're a patient there or not, you're going to be screened.

Anyone who walks in to Washington County Hospital will be screened for the flu and Ebola.

If your temperature is normal, you're given the all clear.

If you're running a fever;

“We would then as you the questions about travel. Have you been outside the country? Have you been up close and personal with anyone who has been outside of the country?” asked Chief Nurse Executive Candice Hawley.

Further testing is done if someone answers ‘yes,' and masks are given to those who caught the flu.

Hawley said with more than 200 people walking in and out of these doors every day, she and her staff don't want to take any chances.

“We really see this as a way to make sure that we are doing the right things everyday not just in a situation like this,” she said.

“The first time I came in, it kind of caught me off guard, I thought, ‘What's this for?' But now I know and it is a good idea,” said Brenda Scrivner.

Scrivner said she is in and out of the hospital once a day as an at home care helper.

Posted signs let folks know about the screenings and that the only way in is through the main entrance or the ER.

It's a precaution some say is comforting.

“It will help a lot,” said Scrivner.

Since the testing started Monday, we're told no one with a fever has had contact with people outside of the country.

The hospital will continue to screen everyone until further notice.

Copyright 2014 KFVS. All rights reserved.
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