Food prices on the rise in the Heartland - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Food prices on the rise in the Heartland

The American Farm Bureau reports shoppers are paying slightly more for food compared to the first half of 2014. The American Farm Bureau reports shoppers are paying slightly more for food compared to the first half of 2014.
SIKESTON, MO (KFVS) - Shoppers are paying more for food compared to the first half of 2014.

According to the American Farm Bureau Federation's latest Semi-Annual Marketbasket Survey, Americans are paying 2 percent more than they were a year ago.

Of the 16 food items surveyed, seven of them increased in average price.

Items that increased include:

  • Sirloin tip roast, up 27 percent to $5.52 per pound,
  • Ground chuck, up 17 percent to $4.31 per pound,
  • Sliced deli ham, up 16 percent to $5.44 per pound,
  • Bacon, up 9 percent to $5.11 per pound,
  • Shredded cheddar, up 6 percent to $4.78 per pound,
  • Eggs, up 7 percent to $1.95 per dozen,
  • Whole milk, up 2 percent to $3.78 per gallon.

The Farm Bureau said the price increases are essentially in line with the average rate of inflation.

However, the Southeast Missouri Food Bank said high prices takes a toll on what the pantry is able to offer.

"We're not able to make the dollar stretch quite as far," said Kate Struttman, the chief development officer for the food bank. "We're not able to feed quite as many people with the same amount of money that we were using before. On the flip side it also means that more people are in need. More people are trying to make up that difference by utilizing our pantries, utilizing SNAP, utilizing different things that we do. Therefore people need assistance and our buying power is less. It's just kind of a vicious cycle."

Struttman said that more and more people are utilizing the services the food bank offers than they did in the past.

"I think it's that our unemployment rate is not going down, that our poverty level is not decreasing, the increasing price of food, a lot of different things," Struttman said. "The summer is ending so a lot of the people who had their own little gardens and things like that, well the time for that is ending. There are just so many different reasons why people need to utilize us then they did in the past."

The food bank said any extra support as the holiday season approaches.

One way is through Missouri's "Share the Harvest" program.

Missouri hunters can help by donating a few pounds of deer meet or even a whole deer to participating meat processors around the state.

The meat will then be distributed to people in need.

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