Study: 40 percent of parents get medicine dosage wrong, parents - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Study: 40 percent of parents get medicine dosage wrong, parents and nurses react

The study shows about 40 percent of parents get their children’s dosage wrong. The study shows about 40 percent of parents get their children’s dosage wrong.
CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) -

When their children aren't feeling well, parents want to make them feel better fast. However, doctors say it's important not to get in a hurry when it comes to measuring out the correct dosage of medicine.

Getting the dosage wrong is a mistake that's more common than some might think, according to new research published Monday by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The study shows about 40 percent of parents get their children’s dosage wrong.

Whether it’s because they mix up a tablespoon and a teaspoon or use a kitchen spoon which can be inaccurate, doctors say it is an easy mistake to make. That’s why they’re urging parents to be more careful.

Local mothers say they have their “go-to” medicines when their kids are sick.

"Mine would definitely be ibuprofen,” Allison Hileman, a mother of three, said.

"Tylenol, children’s Tylenol," Lacie Moats, a mother of eight, said.

Moats’ kids range from 14 months to 13 years old.

"My pediatrician has given us a little dosage chart for over-the-counter medicines," Moats said.

She's extra careful to get the dose right, but she says it could be an easy mistake for parents to make.

"You’re always just trying to comfort them and you grab a bottle and you pour it and go with it,” Moats said.

Hileman says when in doubt, ask the professional.

"If their temperature is not going down after I give them the dose, I'm afraid I'm going to overdose them so I always double check with my doctor,” Hileman said.

Nurse Nina Marshall at the Cape Girardeau County Rural Health Clinic says those moms have the right idea.

"You wouldn't want to over dose obviously but you don't want to under dose either because you want to make sure that the medication is doing what it's supposed to do,” Marshall said.

She says to get it right, use the right tools.

"Use the measuring device that comes with your medication,” Marshall said.

She says always refer to the dosage chart.

"It's all according to age and weight,” Marshall said.

If you don't have that dosage chart on hand, there's an app for that. It's called Kid's Fever MD. You choose the type of medication you have, the product, your child's weight, and then it tells you the correct dosage for your child.

Marshall says an accurate dose is your best bet for getting your kids back up to 100 percent. Also, keep in mind the spoon you get out of your kitchen drawer, likely isn't an exact teaspoon or tablespoon. That's why Marshall says using the measuring cup or the syringe that comes with the medicine is your safest option.

Copyright 2014 KFVS. All rights reserved.

  • SPONSORED BY SOUTHEAST HEALTHHealthMore>>

  • Salmonella outbreak in raw turkey products, infecting 90 so far, warns CDC

    Salmonella outbreak in raw turkey products, infecting 90 so far, warns CDC

    Thursday, July 19 2018 9:40 PM EDT2018-07-20 01:40:09 GMT
    Thursday, July 19 2018 9:40 PM EDT2018-07-20 01:40:09 GMT
    The CDC warned the outbreak "might be widespread in the turkey industry." (Source: AP Photo/Petr David Josek)The CDC warned the outbreak "might be widespread in the turkey industry." (Source: AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

    The CDC warned the outbreak "might be widespread in the turkey industry."

    The CDC warned the outbreak "might be widespread in the turkey industry."

  • New ways to conquer sleep apnea compete for place in bedroom

    New ways to conquer sleep apnea compete for place in bedroom

    Thursday, July 12 2018 7:49 AM EDT2018-07-12 11:49:08 GMT
    Wednesday, July 18 2018 11:58 AM EDT2018-07-18 15:58:58 GMT
    (AP Photo/Emiliano Rodriguez Mega). A technician prepares equipment to monitor Martin Braun's brain activity during a sleep study at the New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York on Wednesday June 27, 2018. Braun, 76, stopped using...(AP Photo/Emiliano Rodriguez Mega). A technician prepares equipment to monitor Martin Braun's brain activity during a sleep study at the New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York on Wednesday June 27, 2018. Braun, 76, stopped using...
    New remedies for sleep apnea are vying for a place in the bedrooms of millions of people craving a good night's rest.
    New remedies for sleep apnea are vying for a place in the bedrooms of millions of people craving a good night's rest.
  • Hepatitis A outbreak reported in TN, 9 other states

    Hepatitis A outbreak reported in TN, 9 other states

    Tuesday, July 17 2018 8:22 PM EDT2018-07-18 00:22:24 GMT
    Tennessee and 11 neighboring states are currently battling a Hepatitis A outbreak. (Source: Pixabay)Tennessee and 11 neighboring states are currently battling a Hepatitis A outbreak. (Source: Pixabay)

    Tennessee and nine neighboring states are currently battling a Hepatitis A outbreak. 

    Tennessee and nine neighboring states are currently battling a Hepatitis A outbreak. 

Powered by Frankly