GMOs: Are they safe for your body? - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

GMOs: Are they safe for your body?

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO (KFVS) - It's a controversial topic hitting the Heartland: GMOs and if they are safe for our bodies. It largely began with a Cape Girardeau mother and others passionate about the health of their kids.

First, she's an RN and mother of three little girls. Rachel Bangert says her family is just like many others, except she believe they are one of the few in the Heartland who are taking a stand against GMOs.

GMOs are genetically modified organisms are created through gene splicing techniques and end up in our food supply.

Bangert says she first became aware when she wanted to know why her three children were getting sick: her youngest with a rare chromosome disorder, middle child with, a respiratory disease, and oldest with ADHD. After years of going to doctors, someone suggested it could be what was going into their bodies that was causing the part of the problem: the food. As Bangert calls it, the typical American diet.

"Chips, soda, pizza, just like everybody else," said Bangert.

She started to make the switch to only organic and clean food.

"It's been a long road but my baby is army-crawling," Bangert said. "Dakota is a much healthier child and Vanessa is off her medication for ADHD and on honor roll."

Now she wants to educate the public. She started a grassroots effort to spread the word through her Facebook page and managed to bring the movie: "Unacceptable Levels" to Cape Girardeau. The movie is now sold out and focuses on toxins and also GMOs.

"In hope this opens people's eyes and encourages them to do research about pesticides and chemicals in our food," said Bangert. "From heart disease to mental health, we expect problems to be the norm and they don't have to be. There are better ways to care for our bodies."

Vanessa, who says she's doing just fine without her medication, says she now loves apples, healthy food, and tries to impress the same habits among their friends.

"I am so much better," said Vanessa. "I make good grades and fast food doesn't even look or sound good to me anymore."

To learn more about how to get involved in the Heartland movement to go: http://www.facebook.com/HolisticallyHeal

Meanwhile, doctors had mixed emotions about GMO safety. Heartland News contacted the FDA who had this statement from Theresa Eisenman with the FDA Office of Media Affair:

"Currently, food manufacturers may indicate through voluntary labeling whether foods have or have not been developed through genetic engineering provided that such labeling is truthful and not misleading.

FDA has received citizen petitions regarding genetically engineered foods, including the labeling of such foods. The agency is currently considering those petitions, and at this time, has not made a decision, in whole or in part, regarding the petitions.

FDA’s role is to ensure that foods under its purview meet applicable safety, labeling, and other regulatory requirements. Foods derived from genetically engineered plants must meet the same requirements, including safety requirements, as other foods, such as foods derived from traditionally bred plants."

The FDA suggests visiting their site for more information.

Copyright 2014 KFVS. All rights reserved.
  • HealthMore>>

  • The creator of Internet Explorer wants to read your mind with a bracelet

    The creator of Internet Explorer wants to read your mind with a bracelet

    Thursday, June 21 2018 5:15 PM EDT2018-06-21 21:15:03 GMT
    The idea of controlling a computer with your thoughts sounds amazing. A New York startup called CRTL-Labs has created a non-invasive device they claim will make this an everyday reality.
    The idea of controlling a computer with your thoughts sounds amazing. A New York startup called CRTL-Labs has created a non-invasive device they claim will make this an everyday reality.
  • The best wetsuits

    The best wetsuits

    Tuesday, June 19 2018 2:29 PM EDT2018-06-19 18:29:11 GMT
    An investment in a good wetsuit allows you to surf from sunup to sundown, while the right fit keeps you warm and dry all day long. To help you navigate the sea of available options, we've put together a list of the...
    An investment in a good wetsuit allows you to surf from sunup to sundown, while the right fit keeps you warm and dry all day long. To help you navigate the sea of available options, we've put together a list of the best...
  • From J.A.R.V.I.S to John Legend, here are our favorite A.I. assistants

    From J.A.R.V.I.S to John Legend, here are our favorite A.I. assistants

    Thursday, June 21 2018 4:00 PM EDT2018-06-21 20:00:08 GMT
    John Legend will soon be a voice option for Google Assistant, which got us to thinking: What are some of the best voices of technology through the years? From HAL to KITT, our list takes a deep dive into the world...
    John Legend will soon be a voice option for Google Assistant, which got us to thinking: What are some of the best voices of technology through the years? From HAL to KITT, our list takes a deep dive into the world of A.I....
  • SPONSORED BY SOUTHEAST HEALTHHealthMore>>

  • Smoking hits new low; about 14 percent of US adults light up

    Smoking hits new low; about 14 percent of US adults light up

    Tuesday, June 19 2018 1:10 AM EDT2018-06-19 05:10:52 GMT
    Thursday, June 21 2018 7:53 PM EDT2018-06-21 23:53:42 GMT
    (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File). FILE - In this June 22, 2012, file photo, a smoker snuffs out a cigarette at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. The rate of smoking among adults in the U.S. fell to about 14 percent in 2017, according to new data relea...(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File). FILE - In this June 22, 2012, file photo, a smoker snuffs out a cigarette at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. The rate of smoking among adults in the U.S. fell to about 14 percent in 2017, according to new data relea...
    Smoking by US adults hits another all-time low; about 14 percent smoke cigarettes.
    Smoking by US adults hits another all-time low; about 14 percent smoke cigarettes.
  • Some fear changes to state laws as US weighs pot medicine

    Some fear changes to state laws as US weighs pot medicine

    Tuesday, June 19 2018 2:20 AM EDT2018-06-19 06:20:35 GMT
    Thursday, June 21 2018 7:53 PM EDT2018-06-21 23:53:35 GMT
    (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert). In this April 23, 2018, photo, Meagan Patrick kisses her daughter, Addelyn Patrick, 5, in the playroom at Realm of Caring in Colorado Springs, Colo. Addelyn was born with a brain malformation and suffers from multiple forms o...(AP Photo/Thomas Peipert). In this April 23, 2018, photo, Meagan Patrick kisses her daughter, Addelyn Patrick, 5, in the playroom at Realm of Caring in Colorado Springs, Colo. Addelyn was born with a brain malformation and suffers from multiple forms o...
    Parents who have used cannabis to treat severe epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory as the US government nears decision on drug made from marijuana plant.
    Parents who have used cannabis to treat severe epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory as the US government nears decision on drug made from marijuana plant.
  • New evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer's

    New evidence that viruses may play a role in Alzheimer's

    Thursday, June 21 2018 11:13 AM EDT2018-06-21 15:13:24 GMT
    Thursday, June 21 2018 5:54 PM EDT2018-06-21 21:54:54 GMT
    A  team led by researchers at New York's Mount Sinai Health System found that certain viruses - including two extremely common herpes viruses - affect the behavior of genes involved in Alzheimer's. (Source: Raycom Media)A team led by researchers at New York's Mount Sinai Health System found that certain viruses - including two extremely common herpes viruses - affect the behavior of genes involved in Alzheimer's. (Source: Raycom Media)

    Could infections somehow set the stage for Alzheimer's? A provocative new study suggests some types of viruses just might play a role.

    Could infections somehow set the stage for Alzheimer's? A provocative new study suggests some types of viruses just might play a role.

Powered by Frankly