Some concerned coal plant regulations could lead to rate hikes - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Some concerned coal plant regulations could lead to rate hikes

Posted: Updated:
Officials at the Sikeston Power Plant, which is a coal-plant, say government regulations are bringing big changes to operations. That could also mean big changes to electric bills. Officials at the Sikeston Power Plant, which is a coal-plant, say government regulations are bringing big changes to operations. That could also mean big changes to electric bills.
  • Heartland NewsMore>>

  • 3 injured in 4-car crash in McCracken County

    3 injured in 4-car crash in McCracken County

    Friday, July 25 2014 9:02 AM EDT2014-07-25 13:02:28 GMT
    Three people were injured in a four-car crash in McCracken County Thursday evening.
    Three people were injured in a four-car crash in McCracken County Thursday evening.
  • 1 teen killed, 3 others injured in Marshall County crash

    1 teen killed, 3 others injured in Marshall County crash

    Friday, July 25 2014 8:48 AM EDT2014-07-25 12:48:29 GMT
    A teenager was killed and three others were injured in a crash early Friday morning in Marshall County.
    A teenager was killed and three others were injured in a crash early Friday morning in Marshall County.
  • B-24 plane flies passengers to the past

    B-24 plane flies passengers to the past

    Friday, July 25 2014 8:28 AM EDT2014-07-25 12:28:24 GMT
    Veterans, their families and history buffs boarded a plane into the past at the Williamson County Regional Airport Thursday.The Commemorative Air Force (CAF) B-24 Bomber, Diamond Lil, provided several flights for folks curious to learn about this flying piece of history.“This is the first B-24 I’ve seen up close,” said Air Force veteran Donald Farris of Miller City. “I’ve seen B-29’s, B-25’s, B-26’s, but not a B-24.”For some, it was a way to connect with loved ones who are now gone. Tina But...
    Veterans, their families and history buffs boarded a plane into the past at the Williamson County Regional Airport Thursday.The Commemorative Air Force (CAF) B-24 Bomber, Diamond Lil, provided several flights for folks curious to learn about this flying piece of history.“This is the first B-24 I’ve seen up close,” said Air Force veteran Donald Farris of Miller City. “I’ve seen B-29’s, B-25’s, B-26’s, but not a B-24.”For some, it was a way to connect with loved ones who are now gone. Tina But...
SIKESTON, MO (KFVS) -

Talk of a possible 80 percent rate increase on electric bills because of coal plant regulations has many people on the Heartland worried.

Officials at the Sikeston Power Plant, which is a coal-plant, say government regulations are bringing big changes to operations. That could also mean big changes to electric bills.

80 percent of Missouri’s power comes from coal.

Sikeston Power Plant Manager Rick Landers says the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is imposing new rules.

“What they’ve done is attacked is every component to the coal plant,” Landers said.

Those rules, Landers says, will cost the plant big time.

“The MATS rule will add a million dollars a year of operating costs, which will be passed on,” Landers said.

He is referring to a specific regulation that is aimed at cutting down on mercury emissions. According to the EPA, mercury and other chemicals are harmful to the environment.

“What we are basically dealing with is not regulation, it’s over regulation,” Landers said.

They are regulations that electric officials say don’t stop at the power plant.

“As regulations go up, and it’s harder to generate with coal, it’s going to cost our members more,” CEO of SEMO Electric Cooperative Sean Vanslyke said.

That news is what really hits home for locals.

“[It is] very scary,” Dexter resident Lola Smith said. “How are we going to make it?”

Vanslyke says they already use power sources other than coal like wind and solar power.

“We are doing a lot of renewable energy. It’s just that the majority of our electricity is generated with coal right now,” Vanslyke said.

Landers says the more costly the regulations, the more likely coal will become a thing of the past. He says the most immediate regulation goes into effect next year.

Vanslyke says if you’d like to voice your concern about the possible rate increases, visit action.coop

He is also encouraging SEMO Electric Cooperative members to fill out the card regarding this issue you received with your bill and return it to the office.

Copyright 2014 KFVS. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow

310 Broadway
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

FCC Public File
publicfile@kfvs12.com
573-335-1212
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KFVS12. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.