Cheap and easy way to foil the flu - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Cheap and easy way to foil the flu

(KFVS) -

Flu season is just around the corner, and you might be looking for a way to keep your family healthy.

It's the flu, and no one is immune.

"If the viruses are out there then they're out there and they're spreading.  Your best prevention is going to be your flu shot."

Carrie Eldridge is the Director of Health Education for the Franklin-Williamson Bi-County Health Department. She demonstrated a little experiment often used for school children that involves a setting powder and a black light.

"And you shine that black light and you can see it as plain as day."

If the powder was contagious, Eldridge would have contaminated the entire room in less than a minute.

To foil the flu, Eldridge says there are a lot of over-the-counter methods you can try including hand sanitizers, but she says, "they're a temporary solution."

But the easiest and cheapest way to get rid of those germs... 

"Soap and water are still your best choice."

At least 20 seconds with soap and warm water, which is just long enough for little ones (or big ones for that matter) to say the alphabet twice. Then, Eldridge says rinse and try to use a paper towel instead of clean hands on all the handles when leaving. 

"If you notice, a lot of rest rooms are starting to put next to the entrances or exits of the bathroom doors and that's supposed to be for that purpose.  You open the door, prop it open with your foot, throw that paper towel away and walk out the door."

Eldridge says, if you run a fever with the flu, be sure to wait at least 24 hours after it breaks before returning to work or school, or you might still be contagious.

The Franklin-Williamson Bi-County Health Department offers flu shots during their walk-in hours on Wednesday. 

Copyright 2013 KFVS. All rights reserved.

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