Government shutdown a buzzkill for brewers - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Government shutdown a buzzkill for brewers

The creative process for beer brewing is at a standstill as the government shutdown moves in to week two. The creative process for beer brewing is at a standstill as the government shutdown moves in to week two.
Not only can Rhude not get the ingredient approval from federal government, a process that would normally take two weeks max, but the labels on his other draft beers can't be served cold just yet either. Not only can Rhude not get the ingredient approval from federal government, a process that would normally take two weeks max, but the labels on his other draft beers can't be served cold just yet either.
He says until the government opens back up, the beer will have to wait to be tapped, which is not something a brewer wants to do. He says until the government opens back up, the beer will have to wait to be tapped, which is not something a brewer wants to do.
CHESTER, IL (KFVS) -

The government shutdown isn't good news for craft beer lovers across America because it has halted production of new brews.

One local brewer says it's creating quite the buzzkill for him and his customers.

Ken Rhude, your typical beer connoisseur, says you have to be some sort of creative genius to come up with a specialty draft beer.

His latest concoction.

"We mashed 12 cakes in with our regular grains for a stout and then we are also going to put in some locally roasted coffee at the end, like chocolate cake and coffee," he said.

The creative process is at a standstill as the government shutdown moves in to week two.

Not only can he not get the ingredient approval from federal government, a process that would normally take two weeks max, but the labels on his other draft beers can't be served cold just yet either.

"This is a ridiculous stunt that is causing real economic harm to little guys like me," said Rhude.

He says until the government opens back up, the beer will have to wait to be tapped, which is not something a brewer wants to do.

"Hopefully it's not going to have to sit for too long where it can be oxidized where it gets these cardboard flavors that make the beer less desirable," he said.

Rhude says the worst part about the whole ordeal is that he sent in the ingredient approval just a day before the shutdown went into effect.

The idea for the new brew was a 40th birthday present for his wife.

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