What low Mississippi River means in the Heartland - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

What low Mississippi River means in the Heartland

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Consumers are told to expect higher prices at the grocery store and at restaurants because of the ongoing drought but low Mississippi River levels may play a role too. Consumers are told to expect higher prices at the grocery store and at restaurants because of the ongoing drought but low Mississippi River levels may play a role too.

Consumers are told to expect higher prices at the grocery store and at restaurants because of the ongoing drought but low Mississippi River levels may play a role too. 

"Probably hundreds of millions of dollars to the American economy," Dan Fetherston with SEMO Milling said. "Well it means the repercussions from the drought haven't stopped."

Fetherston says the drought can still be seen with the Mississippi River levels.

"As things have to move by truck or rail because they can't get through with a barge, I think the costs of goods are going to be impacted," Fetherston said.

Fetherston says he like many farmers are just waiting to see if and when the shut down of the Mississippi happens in the Heartland.

At SEMO Milling, they grind corn into other products so companies can use it for finished food products. They use 6 to 7 million bushels of locally grown corn to make their products.

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