Some southeast farmers expected to grow best crops in state due - KFVS12 News & Weather Cape Girardeau, Carbondale, Poplar Bluff

Some southeast farmers expected to grow best crops in state due to irrigation

Mike Geske calls his water his saving grace. It puts out 3,400 gallons of water a minute. He estimates it shot more than 50 million gallons of water this year alone. Mike Geske calls his water his saving grace. It puts out 3,400 gallons of water a minute. He estimates it shot more than 50 million gallons of water this year alone.
Geske says usually farmers just like athletes compete against each other. However, that's not the case this year though. Geske says usually farmers just like athletes compete against each other. However, that's not the case this year though.
"Everybody is celebrating someone that has a good crop because it's so desperately needed." "Everybody is celebrating someone that has a good crop because it's so desperately needed."
NEW MADRID COUNTY, MO (KFVS) -

Mike Geske is a 3rd generation farmer. It's tough times like this drought he's glad he farms in the Bootheel.

"In a year like this, it's really a blessing," Geske said.  "It's made all the difference in the world this year. We've been very blessed by where we farmed and where we have a plentiful water supply."

Geske calls his water his saving grace. It puts out 3,400 gallons of water a minute. He estimates it shot more than 50 million gallons of water this year alone.

"Normally, our irrigation is supplemental irrigation," Geske said. "We fill in between the rain. This year there wasn't any rain. So we have had to water this crop almost from the very beginning."

Geske says usually farmers just like athletes compete against each other. However, that's not the case this year though.

"Many time farmers all want to have the best yield to earn bragging rights," Geske said. "This year it's different. Everybody is celebrating someone that has a good crop because it's so desperately needed."

But, Geske says all of this has little effect on prices you pay at the store.

"Every dollar that the consumer spends on food, only 12 cents of it gets back to the farm anyway," Geske said. "So when our prices fluctuate up and down, it has very little effect on the price of food."

But it certainly affects the farmer. A year comes to an end with a plowed field.

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